Wordy Wednesday

Today’s post is an ode to one of my favourite letters: v.

There are so many lovely ‘v’ words (vicious, vain, vivid, vitriol, velvet…) but I will define my top three: viscous, voracious, and visceral.

VWORDS

Viscous

Viscous is an adjective that means “to have a thick, sticky consistency between solid and liquid; having a high viscosity.” I like to use this word when describing blood.

Voracious

Voracious is an adjective, meaning “to devour.” One can have a voracious appetite for food; they can also have a voracious appetite for reading books (like me!).

Visceral

Visceral is an adjective that is mostly used in a figurative way, for example: “characterized by or proceeding from instinct rather than intellect; dealing with coarse or base emotions.” It is still used in biology, where viscera refers to “the organs in the cavities of the body, especially those in the abdominal cavity.”

Wordy Wednesday

I have so much I want to write. So many new ideas, on top of insights and questions and observations… But I’ve been tired. Bone-deep exhaustion fogs the majority of my waking hours; I don’t know what it’s like to not be tired anymore.

Today’s word is a happy one:

Redolent

Redolent has two definitions in the Merriam-Webster dictionary that I enjoy very much:

  1. exuding fragrance : aromatic
  2 a : full of a specified fragrance : scented

  • “air redolent of seaweed”
      b : evocative, suggestive

  • “a city redolent of antiquity”

 

Isn’t it such a beautiful word?

Wordy Wednesday

The word of the day has been buzzing around in my head since yesterday. Does that ever happen to you? Do you ever get a word or a phrase stuck in your head?

It happens to me a lot. I try to write them down in my notebook, or on a scrap of paper, or the notepad on my phone.

Today’s word is:

Mellifluous

Mellifluous is an adjective. It means a pleasantly flowing quality, suggestive of music; it tends to describe voices. Synonyms include lyrical, mellow, melodic, and musical.

To me, Patrick Stewart, Ian McKellen, Jim Morrison, David Gilmour, Billie Holiday, Cate Blanchett, and Tracy Chapman are among the people with the most mellifluous voices. Morgan Freeman has a mellifluous voice, too, of course, but that’s an easy one.

It’s interesting to me that the most pleasing voices are low, deep, and slow, and therefore typically masculine. Antonyms of mellifluous, like grating, are used to describe higher pitched female voices. Hmm. When you think of someone with an irritating, grating, squeaky, or monotonous voice, whose do you hear?

 

Wordy Wednesday

Hello friends!

Since I have hit a wall creatively, I have decided to begin something new. Every Wednesday, I will post a word I really REALLY enjoy. There are many words in the English language – some gross me out, some remind me of soft and fluffy things, while others evoke dark things that thrive in deep shadowy places.

Today’s word is:

Truculent

Truculent is an adjective. It means fierce; cruel; vitriolic; scathing; aggressively hostile; belligerent. Its origin is Latin, the roots of which mean savage and pitiless.

Can you think of anyone who fits this description?

I can think of a few. From real life, and from pop culture.

Who comes to mind:

  • Wolverine (hello aggressively hostile)
  • Donald Trump (vitriolic)
  • Yosemite Sam
  • Doomsday

Bad guys tend to be truculent – but some heroes can fall in there, too.

Be careful 😉